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It's time to show Ubisoft the potential of an Assassin's Creed 3 sequel involving Connor Kenway. The Wolfkin Initiative aims to demonstrate to Ubisoft that we, as fans as well as consumers, will buy and support another Connor game. We've all seen the posts claiming that Connor's character was "boring" or "emotionless". But we know that his character is so much more then what is on the surface. So together, let's show them another side.

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I am an introvert, but let’s face it- the majority of people identify as extrovert. Ezio is very extroverted, as are 99.9% of all game protagonists.  I really enjoy playing as extrovert characters- it gives me a chance to experience living life in a different way to how I actually do; I like to laugh at their jokes and their breezy, open way of dealing with people.  Obviously, it’s a lot of fun to run around and be a wise-cracking badass, no matter who you are!

However, Connor is the first introverted main protagonist I’ve ever encountered- THE FIRST ONE, and I think this radically different way of viewing the world is alien to many people, forcing them out of their comfort zone, and causing them to have a negative knee-jerk reaction to something they just don’t understand.  To us introverts, however, playing through Connor’s life feels like coming home- you just want to say, “Where have you been all my gaming life?”.  You notice every single little introvert cue they put in the game (which pass unnoticed by extroverts, for the most part), because you’ve done them yourself.  I’ve connected so deeply with Connor because there is a synergy there that I’ve never felt with any other game character before.

For me, while playing as Ezio, I felt FOR him: I felt bad for him when he lost his family, I cheered for him when he triumphed over the Borgia, I was happy for him when he finally found true love in his twilight years.  But playing as Connor, I felt AS him: I feel his anguish viscerally when he loses his mother and his village burns, I experience his innocent awe at seeing the maelstrom that is colonial Boston for the first time, I am frustrated by the casual denigration and ignorance of the people surrounding him, and I savor the quiet peace of the Davenport homestead.  I can feel his emotions running deeply under a surface of impenetrable stone, an armor built up not truly by choice, but by circumstance.  Even the tiniest moments of camaraderie, chagrin, doubt and humor are magnified ten-fold for me, because I’ve had those moments myself- they are me, this character IS me.

So when people attack Connor, flippantly brushing aside his approach to the world as “cold and brutish”, his demeanor as “boring”, and his heart as “emotionless”, it feels like they are really attacking me, and my own way of living life.  It’s why these attacks and comments, especially the truly cruel or ignorant ones, hurt so much: It’s not just about “some stupid game character”, and that we should “just get over it”;  it’s about dignity, and learning to honor and celebrate the differences (and similarities) between two different philosophies.

I defend and fight for Connor because he represents a different way of living life, one that parallels my own, and it deserves as much respect and recognition as any other.

I just wish that those who dismiss and denigrate Connor, simply because he is different from them, would give his story another chance.  We introverts have happily been playing as sassy extroverts for years, and have gained a lot of wisdom from experiencing that which is different from ourselves- if only more of the extroverts would take a “leap of faith” and try the same, they might be surprised at what they might learn!